romanmissal 160The Roman Missal, 3rd ed. will be implemented in the United States of America on the First Sunday of Advent, November 27, 2011. We have gathered resources and information to help parishoners understand and feel comfortable with the changes in the words we will hear and speak at Mass.

Here is a brief history of Divine Mercy Sunday to compliment the stained glass window in the church at St. Jude.

On the first Sunday of Lent, February 22, 1931, Our Lord Jesus Christ is reported to have granted a vision of Himself to St. Maria Faustina Kowalska of the Congregation of Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy in the city of Plock in Poland.

She saw Him clothed in an ankle-length white garment, His right hand was raised in blessing: the left was touching His garment at the breast where, from beneath the garment lightly drawn aside, two large rays were coming forth as though from His heart. The ray to the left of the onlooker was red in color; the ray to the right was pale, that is colorless, like a clear crystal.

After St. Faustina had gazed intently at the vision for a while with emotions of deep reverence and great joy, Jesus gave her these instructions:

Paint an image according to the pattern you see, with the signature: Jesus, I trust in You! I desire that this image be venerated, first in your chapel, and then throughout the world. I promise that the soul that will venerate this image will not perish. I also promise victory over enemies already here on earth, especially at the hour of death. I Myself will defend it as My own glory.

Upon the request of her spiritual director, St. Faustina asked whether the words "Christ, the King of Mercy" could be the inscription on the image. Jesus gave her this answer: I am the King of Mercy. I desire that this image be displayed in public on the first Sunday after Easter. That Sunday is the Feast of Mercy. St. Faustina then heard these words coming from God the Father: Through the Word Incarnate I make known the bottomless depth of My mercy.

Further, in prayer she received the inner understanding that these words must be clearly in evidence on the image: "Jesus, I trust in You."

When her spiritual director asked about the meaning of the rays, she received this explanation from the Lord: The two rays denote Blood and Water. The pale ray stands for the Water which makes souls righteous. The red ray stands for the Blood which is the life of souls. These two rays issued forth from the very depths of My tender mercy when My agonized Heart was opened by a lance on the cross...Happy is the one who will dwell in their shelter, for the just hand of God shall not lay hold of him.
Mission Statement:
The music ministry at St. Jude Parish strives to proclaim the goodness of our God in song, and to support the singing of the entire parish family. In joy and thankfulness, we bring the best that we have to offer, a gift service and praise.  

As a musician there is no greater privilege than to have the opportunity to give one’s gifts in the house of God.  Sometimes we forget this; the concert stage is more glamorous and rock stars are more famous.  Yet the church is a special place for music making.  It is a place for family, for worship, and for transformation.  We believe in the transformative powers of music, to move us to tears, both of joy and sorrow.  Music can help us express the deepest longing of our souls, and express them in a unity and harmony that speech cannot give.

There are many opportunities to be involved in the music ministry at St. Jude Parish. Regardless of what your musical gift is, there is a place for you to serve. Browse the links on the right side of the page for more information about each ensemble or contact the office directly about getting involved.

Contact
Music Director
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574-291-0570

Adoration before the Blessed Sacrament draws the worshiper into spiritual communion with God. Whether done on one's own time or at a scheduled service, adoration of the eucharistic presence of Christ fosters our devotion for participation in the Mass.

Jesus instituted the Eucharist for our eating and drinking. Sharing communion at Mass brings us nourishment, healing and sustenance. There is no substitute for participation in the Eucharist; adoration enhances it, not replaces it.

Catholics reserve communion hosts in a tabernacle. The primary purpose for this custom is to have the Body of Christ ready for the dying at any time. The tabernacle also provides communion for the sick or those unable to come to Mass. Because it houses the sacramental Body of Christ, it serves as a place for adoration.

Adoration may be private or public. When adoring the Blessed Sacrament in private, Catholics usually go to any church, where the communion hosts are kept inside the tabernacle. They say whatever prayers they wish. Public adoration may take place in the context of a brief service (traditionally called "Benediction" although that only refers to the blessing which concludes it) or over a more extended period of time. The Blessed Sacrament is usually presented for adoration outside the tabernacle on an altar or a stand.

Whether the Blessed Sacrament is inside or outside the tabernacle, adoration invites us into prayer and prepares us for the Eucharist.

Please join us every First Friday beginning after the 8am Mass and
concluding with prayer beginning at 6:30pm.

The Adult Choir at St. Jude is the main musical ensemble of the parish. It sings for all the major liturgies and feasts of the church year, including All Saints, Christ the King, Christmas, and the Easter Triduum. The choir also performs at the annual “Christmas at St. Jude” concert in December. The music we sing spans over a thousand years of Christian musical expression, from gospel and praise and worship music to classical, baroque, and Gregorian chant.

You do not have to have any previous experience singing in choirs to join. Each rehearsal begins with vocal instruction and a warm-up designed to strengthen our voices, improve our singing, and unify our sound. Additional practice materials, such as recordings and videos are also available for those who feel they need more than the once-weekly rehearsal to fully participate. If you are interested in joining the adult choir you are more than welcome to stop by a rehearsal and visit, or contact the director about what your role might be.

Contact
Music Director
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Lectors

When the Scriptures are read in the Church, God himself is speaking to his people, and Christ, present in his own word, is proclaiming the gospel. The readings of God's word must therefore be listened to by all with reverence; they make up a principal element of the liturgy. In the biblical readings, God's word addresses all people of every era and is understandable to them, and a fuller understanding and efficacy are fostered by a living commentary on it, that is to say, by the homily, understood as an integral part of the liturgical action (GIRM 29).

Those Catholics who feel called to this Ministry should contact the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Greeters

These ministers welcome all who enter the doors of the Church. They are the first people that newcomers to our parish encounter. This ministry is important as it shows how friendly and welcoming we are as a parish. It is mentioned frequently as the reason people chose to join St. Jude parish.

Altar Servers

Altar Servers give glory to God and enhance the dignity and prayerfulness of the celebration of the Eucharist.

Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion - Sick and Homebound

These persons are provided education and training to assist in the distribution of the Body and Blood of Christ to the sick, the hospitalized and the homebound. They are helpers to the priest who is the ‘ordinary’ minister. Their own personal lives must be lived in the light of the sacramental character of the work they do and must therefore be practicing Catholics.

Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion

These persons are provided education and training to assist in the distribution of the Body and Blood of Christ at the Eucharistic Table. They are helpers to the priest who is the ‘ordinary' minister. Their own personal lives must be lived in the light of the sacramental character of the work they do and must therefore be practicing Catholics. Parishioners who feel called to this ministry should contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Sacristans

Sacristans care for the sacred spaces, vessels and objects at St. Jude parish. They prepare the altar with the items needed for Mass and other liturgies. Sacristans must have an understanding of the demands of the liturgy and must know what items are needed and know where those items are stored.  Anyone who feels called to serve the parish as a Sacristan should contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Director of Liturgy and Music

 

The cantor ministry at St. Jude plays a vital and important role in our ministry. More than any other ministry, the cantors of St. Jude are called to serve, to support and lead the singing of the whole faith community. Although a cantor may occasionally sing a solo, their role is not that of a soloist. They support the singing of the congregation by singing clearly and intelligibly (very much unlike the national anthem is typically sung!). If you are interested in being a part of this ministry, contact the director of music.

Music Director
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574-291-0570

 

The greatest sacred instrument is the human voice; through singing we create the music most closely tied to our spirit and our bodies.  The main purpose of instruments like the organ and the piano is to support the singing of the congregation.  So then why do we use other instruments as well, such as drums, woodwinds, or brass?  These instruments, more than any other, are for PARTIES!

Liturgy, after all, is basically a party. It’s a celebration—it may be a very solemn party, certainly one ruled by very strict forms, and thus very formal—but at it’s core, the liturgy is a party. It incorporates gathering, greeting, singing, eating, drinking, and more singing. Trumpets, flutes, stringed instruments—these things are to add splendor, beauty, and joy to our greatest parties.

Think of them as festive instruments—used primarily for feasts!  

No matter what you play, woodwind, brass, string, or percussion, there is an opportunity for you at St. Jude! We would love to have a woodwind ensemble, a brass quintet, or a string quartet--all kinds of things are possible! Contact the director about specific opportunities.